Saturday, November 29, 2008

Managing Study Stress among the Students

Tips to Stay Relaxed and Remember More
By C. Radhakrishnan

First of all, let me tell you the best ‘Study Stress Management’ tip is to be confident and prepared, and to stay cool. If you have mastered learning and study, then you should never feel anxious, tense, or nervous in an examination.

Stress can be both a help and an obstacle to study and the development of Memory.
This write up will help you understand what stress is, why and how stress is created, and how it is controlled at the optimum levels for study and for examinations.

Every year, as examinations time approaches, in our country generally February, March and April, the question of student examination stress is raised in the press, on TV programs, and by students themselves. An article in a weekend newspaper during these months was no exception: ‘Teenagers approaching 10th, 12th, CET or University Exams in the coming months are looking to doctors to help them cope with tension…Increasingly, academic stress is affecting younger and younger children as there is more pressure for academic achievement, especially from the parents and school authorities.’

This problem applies particularly to 10th and 12th students. In many cases this is a once-only chance to gain access to a University and a selected career. Once this hurdle is jumped – successfully – the same pressure does not apply to examinations at University. The stress arises mainly because the number of University seats is limited, and students are selected on the basis of their marks and entrance exam performance so the examination becomes a competition. Worry about how they will be able to pay for their studies, or repay the loans afterwards, also adds to the stress.

Students, who have developed a proper attitude to learning, memory and study, and learned good techniques and habits, should not have to worry about stress. Stress is essential for effective study and memory, but it is the excess stress – anxiety, worry, fear of failure etc. – which creates a level of stress high enough to cause loss of memory and memory blocks in examinations. This is what students fear, that they will not remember what they have learned. Of course, if they haven’t learned the work in first place, stress or no stress will make no difference.

Naturally, all of us have moments of self-doubt, but it is when self-doubt becomes more than momentary that it becomes a problem. Almost everyone feels worried before an exam, suppose it is board exam, the nervousness is double. Butterflies in the stomach and worrying thoughts - 'Will I be able to answer the questions?' 'Have I done enough revision?' - are indications of exam anxiety that are probably familiar to all students. In fact, a certain amount of nervous tension probably helps us perform to the best of our ability and helps us to feel alert and focused. But too much anxiety can obstruct thoughts, create a negative frame of mind, and lead to panic and poor performance in the exam.

Howard Bloom in his book on evolution, ‘Global Brain’, says, ‘Humans who can solve a problem remain vigorous. But, those who cannot get a grip on their dilemma become victims of self-destruct mechanisms.’ This applies to students – those who are on top of their work and see no problem they cannot deal with are successful, those who feel they have lost their grip, and let self-doubt take control of their thinking, generally fail.

Self-doubt can lead to depression. This will have serious consequences for health, mental stability, and for the ability to study successfully. No one can see into your mind and read your thoughts, so don’t expect anyone to offer help. You have to seek help, and it is important that you do so early. Go to someone you can trust, and who is mature enough to understand your problem, and talk it through with them, and ask for advice.

Drugs to relieve stress, such as anti-depressants, can be dangerous and may make the condition worse instead of better, and the side effects can be quite serious.

It is very important that parents and teachers should also be sensitive to this problem, and be aware that it is likely to affect some students more than others. Keeping a watchful eye on any change of mood or activities may help to head off a potential problem, even a disaster, or tragedy.

There are a lot of things you can do to help manage exam anxiety and twist painful, anxious thoughts into more creative pressure. First let us see what we can do before the exam to reduce stress.

1. It's hard to panic if you are feeling relaxed. Try to make a system of revision that gives you time to relax, especially last thing at night. Experiment until you find the best way of relaxing to suit you - a long bath, exercise, listening to music, watching a dance or prayer or even chatting some time with the most attached friend, either directly or over phone (avoid using computers).

2. Relaxation and positive stress management techniques can be learned and acquired with practice. Knowing how to relax is very important in the pre exam days, and on the day itself. If you think you are under-performing in exams due to exam anxiety or panic, do think ahead and seek help.

3. It helps to feel as well-prepared as possible. As well as thinking about the subjects you are revising, it can be useful to pay attention to practical aspects of the exam. Find out where it is scheduled to take place and how long it will take you to get there. It's a good idea to go and look at the room/building so that it feels more familiar. Make sure you know the rules and regulations about what you can take into the exam room etc.

4. Put yourself into a positive frame of mind by imagining how you would like things to go. Imagine/visualise yourself going for the exam feeling confident and comfortable - try to portray it in as much detail as possible. Rather like dress rehearsing for a part in a play, this can replace negative, anxious thoughts with more positive ones.

5. Don't work to the last minute on the night or morning before the exam. Last-minute revision may leave you feeling messed up and anxious.

Now we can move on to the exam day. Here are some tried and tested solutions to the 'I can't answer anything' feeling and other upsetting thoughts about exams.

When you get into the exam room and sit down, the following approach can help settle your tension:

1. Take a deep breath in and a long breath out.

2. Breathe in again and straighten your back.

3. Look straight ahead at something inanimate (the wall, a picture, the clock...) and focus your mind on the positive thought 'I CAN DO this exam' as you breathe out.

4. Take another deep breath in and a long breath out. Then breathe normally.

5. CBSE have given you 15 minutes to read the question paper, so do so thoroughly. If you begin to feel nervousness again, repeat the focusing exercise. Nervousness will stop you reading carefully, so it is important to keep yourself focused and positive. Read the whole paper once, then read it again and mark the questions you think you can answer. Then read those questions carefully - make sure you understand what is required - and select the ones you are going to answer.

6. Decide on the order in which you'll answer the questions. It is usually best to begin with the one you feel most confident about. Think about how you will plan your time, and stick to your plan.

7. Plan out your answer for each question as you go. If you find that thoughts or ideas about other questions come into your head, write them down on a rough paper - don't spend time thinking about them now.

8. If your concentration weakens or you begin to feel anxious, you could try the focusing exercise again, or use one of the following techniques to help you overcome anxious thoughts. If you are worried that you haven't got time to spare on this, remember that taking 5 or 10 minutes now may save you spending the rest of the exam in a state of fear.

Here it’s relevant to brief you on some anxiety management techniques.

1. Negative thought-blocking
When we become worried we begin to have negative thoughts ('I can't answer anything', 'I'm going to panic' etc). If this is happening, arrest these thoughts by mentally shouting 'STOP!’ Once you have literally stopped the thoughts, you can continue planning, or practise a relaxation technique.

2. Creating gentle pain
Pain effectively overrides all other thoughts and impulses. Even very gentle pain - such as lightly pressing your fingernails into your palm - can block feelings of nervousness. Some people find it helpful to place an elastic band around one finger, and lightly twang it when they are becoming anxious.

3. Focusing
Looking out of the window, noticing the number of people with white hair, counting the number of desks in each row... all help to distract your attention from anxious thoughts and keep your mind busy. Mental games such as making words out of another word, using alphabetical lists etc are all good forms of distraction.

4. Practice a mantra
Derived from meditation, a mantra is a word or phrase which you repeat to yourself. Saying something like 'calm' or 'relax' under your breath or in your head, over and over again, can help reduce anxiety.

5. Positive Association
It can help to carry or wear something with positive associations with another person or place. Touching this object can be consoling in its own right, then allow yourself a few minutes to think about the person or situation which makes you feel good. This can have a really calming effect.

6. Self-talk
In exam anxiety we often give ourselves negative messages, 'I can't do this' 'I'm going to fail' 'I'm useless'. Try to consciously replace these with positive, encouraging thoughts: 'This is just anxiety, it can't harm me', 'Relax, concentrate, it's going to be OK', 'I'm getting there, nearly over'.

From the above mentioned distraction techniques whichever has worked for you, finish by going through the refocusing exercise. Remember, it only takes 30 seconds or so, but may have a great effect on your ability to believe in yourself and the task in hand. Different techniques work for different people, so it's worth experimenting to find the ones that are suitable for you. Developing techniques for managing tension/anxiety can take time, so it pays to keep practising.

Conclusion
To me, learning to control stress, and adjusting it to the optimum level for successful learning, is something students should practice throughout the year, not just a few weeks before the examinations.

In this context it’s worth mentioning what Mental Health Ireland has said on managing exam stress (18 May 2006): “It is perfectly normal to feel some stress, it can keep you focused, but too much will reduce your effectiveness. First, plan your time and keep to a reasonable timetable, create a routine, don't panic. Work now to avoid last minute cramming. Think positively and recall past successes and how you achieved them Concentrate on strengths rather than weaknesses. Do your best: Don't try to be perfect, that will lead to stress. Be realistic, seek help if necessary, and avoid bottling things up. Eat, sleep and exercise normally and well. Use relaxation techniques. The Exam: Use your relaxation method. Slow deep breaths and repeating 'I am calm and relaxed'”.

Print & Online References:
1. Goleman, Daniel – Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ, Bloomsbury Publishing, 1996
2. Ravi, Meera – Teaching through the Heart: Action Plan for Better Teaching, Viva books Pvt Ltd, 2005
3. Adams, Kathleen – Journal to the Self: Twenty-two Paths to Personal Growth, Warner Books, 1990
4. http://www.danielgoleman.info/blog/
5. http://www.acu.edu.au/acu_national/
6. http://mentalhealthireland.ie/index.php

Friday, October 24, 2008

The ABC’s of the Science Textbook

The Science Textbook: Do you find yourself overwhelmed when reading your science text? Is your textbook intimidating? Try these ABC’s of reading Science to help you.

Before Reading: Before Reading don’t just begin reading the first paragraph. Think about what you already know about the subject. Make predictions Make a plan for finding out information

“A” Set a Purpose: “A” Set a Purpose Turn the title or main heading into a question. Look to see if the first page includes a list of objectives or goals. Set your purpose based on subheadings or key terms listed on the first page.

“B” Preview: “B” Preview after you have determined your purpose previews the chapter. Get an idea of what you will be reading before you begin. Look at the following “Preview Checklist” for help as you glance over the pages.

Preview Checklist :Preview Checklist The title The first and last paragraph of the chapter The headings Any words set in bold type or repeated Any boxed material Any photos, charts, or pictures and their captions The list of objectives and any review questions

“C” Plan :“C” Plan Stop and think about what you learned in your preview. Make a list that includes what you learned from boldface words, headings, photos, captions, and first and last paragraphs.

You might also try Outlining!! : You might also try Outlining!! Title of Outline I. Main Topic A. Sublevel 1. Topic a. What you learned b. B. II.

During Reading: During Reading You have your purpose you have a strategy now you need to go back and read this section of the chapter


“D” Read with a Purpose: “D” Read with a Purpose Now that you have previewed the headings, you can create an effective headline. Start your outline with the headings Go back and fill in the sublevels now you give it a try! Just make a quick sketch, don’t spend a lot of time. Biology Textbook


Your outline could look like this: Your outline could look like this: Introduction: The Nature of Science and Biology I. Biology A. Biology: The Science of Our Lives 1. “The Study of Life”, 2. B. Science and the Scientific Method 1. Objective, logical, and repeatable attempt to understand the principles and forces operating in the natural universe 2. II. Evolution A. Development of the Theory of Evolution 1. 2. B. Modern View of the Age of the Earth 1. 2. (Be sure to leave space in your outline for additions)


“E” Connect: “E” Connect Try to find connections between your life and what you are reading. This will help you remember.


After Reading: After Reading As soon as you finish the chapter, sit back and try to recall what you have learned. Use the headings in your Outline to help you.


“F” Pause and Reflect :“F” Pause and Reflect Do you understand what you have read? I’ll bet your answer is “no”. This is to be expected! Before you continue, answer these questions: Did I accomplish the reading purpose I set in the beginning? Do I know what the main topics in the chapter are? Do I understand how the material is organized? Would I feel comfortable taking a test on this material now?


“G” Reread :“G” Reread To remember everything you have read may be as simple as reviewing your outline. For some, it may be beneficial to reread the chapter. If you need more assistance, ask the teacher to clarify questions you may have. Make study cards, this may help you remember key parts of the chapter


“H” Other: “H” Other You may find creating a practice test will help you remember what you have read.


References: References Burke, Jim. Readers Handbook: a student guide for reading and learning. Wilmington: Houghton Mifflin, p. 88-99. http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookintro.html

Effective listening skills

Most of us hear but don’t listen and instead we spend time thinking about what we are going to say next. Poor listening skills can create misunderstandings, make us miss deadlines and focus our attention on the wrong issues and points.

Simple steps to improving your listening skills:

Awareness:

Recognising it as an area of improvement sets you on the path to becoming a better listener.

Convey Interest:

Set aside whatever you’re doing and give the speaker your 100% attention. This offers encouragement to the speaker and he/she doesn’t feel compelled to speak faster or abbreviate their message. Convey interest nonverbally by nodding, maintaining direct eye contact and leaning forward.

Speaker’s Non-Verbal Cues:


Watch out for the speaker’s gestures, facial expressions, tone and volume of voice, as being alert to these cues increases your ability to comprehend the full message.

No ‘Overtaking’:


‘Overtaking’ on the verbal highway or finishing off the speaker’s sentences makes him/her feel rushed and under pressure. Wait till the speaker has finished before interjecting with your comments. If you interrupt by mistake, apologise.

Summarise:


If you aren’t sure of the message, ask the speaker to repeat it. Then, you summarise it, evaluating your own understanding while doing so.

Ask Questions:

This shows genuine interest and offers encouragement to the speaker. Questions like “Do you mean to say...” or “Is this what you have in mind...?” paraphrase the speaker’s remarks.

Fight Impatience:


As we think several times faster than we speak, we become impatient and lose concentration. Instead, use your mind to analyse the speaker’s message and extract the essence.

Pause:

A pause is an effective communication tool — it shows you are thinking before speaking and also creates a certain degree of suspense.

As Ernest Hemingway famously remarked “I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen.”

About the Author: Shital Kakkar Mehra is the founder of Soft Skills International.

Tuesday, October 7, 2008

Math Study Skills

To succeed in math it is important to have effective study strategies. Here are some excellent tips for you to try.

1. If math is difficult for you, audit the course first. You will get most from the course if you take notes, do your homework, ask the teacher questions, study for it and take all the tests. You will have no pressure of being graded.

2. Before registering for math, research which teacher would be best for you. Ask other students which teachers they liked and why. Visit prospective teachers during their office hours; ask about their teaching methods and if you could sit in one session of their course. Be sure to select a teacher who:

* Explains concepts clearly
* Welcomes questions
* Willingly helps students outside of class
* Gives fair tests
* Provides helpful handouts to complement your class notes.

3. Attend all classes and take full class notes. Research has shown that successful students never cut class and usually take down at least 64% of what is discussed in class. Failing students write half as much and often miss class. Remember, missing even one class can put you behind in the course by at least two classes. Do you know why?

4. Consider attending more than one section of the course. By hearing a difficult concept explained a second time you may understand it much better.

5. Make it a practice to read over the topic or chapter before going to your math class. This will give you a much better understanding of what is being discussed in class and as a result you will learn more from lecture.

6. Organize your notes into one large spiral or loose-leaf notebook devoted only to math. Use the first half for class notes and the second half for homework. Take a complete set of class notes and add any helpful clarifications to your notes that you hear in class. Mentally follow all explanations and try to understand the concepts and principles. Then write down the main points, steps in explanations, definitions, examples, solutions or proofs.

7. Dates each day's class notes. Write the topic or chapter heading on top of the page. Leave a 2" margin on the left side for comments. Use only one side of a page, leaving the back for additional examples, notes and clarifications.

8. Label both your notes and your textbook using categories such as: (a) definition of... , (b) theorem..., (c) example or discussion of examples, (d) description of a procedure for solving a problem type, (e) a proof of a theorem or a derivation of a formula, (f) a list of procedure steps, and (g) formulas or equations.

9. It is important to stay current. Do not allow yourself to fall behind or the entire course will become an effort and a struggle for you.

10. Review immediately after class and again eight hours later. Fill in all the missing words or incomplete explanations. Recite important concepts in your own words. Research shows that most of the information is lost within the first 20 to 60 minutes after learning. However, if you review immediately after class and again within the same day, and then do weekly and monthly reviews, the information you have learned will remain in long term memory.

11. Ask questions. Always remember you have the right to ask questions before, during and after class. Never avoid asking a question out of fear of looking stupid. Do not allow a question to go unanswered. Get help fast.

12. Create questions for yourself when you study and then answer them. Be persistent.

13. When you feel "lost" ask your teacher to explain the first step that you did not understand; then question any later steps that you still do not follow. When you cannot see the overall picture of what the teacher is doing, ask questions. See your instructor during office hours and visit the math learning center for help. Notice when you are beginning to get into trouble and seek assistance immediately.

4. To get the most benefit from a help session:

* Use question marks to identify confusing material in your notes or textbook.
* Write down specific questions you will ask.
* Later review what you have learned by "saying" and "doing."

Ask your instructor or tutor if you could explain to them what you have just learned and if you could demonstrate your knowledge by doing a new problem.

15. Always remember the "say and do" principle. Research shows that we remember only 10% of what we read, 20% of what we see, but a full 90% of what we say and do. So, whenever possible say and do.

16. Work out lots of sample problems. Practice, practice, practice. Do assigned problems and lots more. Make up your own problems. Get sample problems from other books. Work with a classmate and explain aloud what you are learning and how to solve problems. Remember the more you "say and do" the more you will be able to recall what you're learning. You must always be actively involved in the learning process.

17. The best time to do your homework is the same day it is assigned. This will help reinforce what you have just learned. Estimate the right answers before you work the problems out. Substitute your answers back into the problem. Redo the problem in a different way to see if your answer still matches.

18. Read and study all your textbook explanations of each type of problem. Whenever possible use additional textbooks and study guides as resources. Each book will discuss your topic differently and offer different examples. This is an excellent way to clarify difficult concepts and to give you more practice problems.

19. Work with a review or course outline book that applies to your math course. They provide many worked-out examples and summary collections of problems and answers which are useful for preparing for tests. Always work out a problem first before reading how the author solved it. Examples of course outline books include: Schaum's, AMSCO, Barron's, Barnes and Nobles.

20. Identify the different types of problems you are learning. Note the elements of each. By identifying the different types of problems, you are more likely to be able to isolate difficult areas in which you need more practice or help.

21. Describe in your own words the similarities and differences between the different types of problems you are learning. Do this aloud with someone else. By understanding the structure of each type of problem you will be able to select the appropriate method or formula for solving it.

22. Know and understand your math terminology. This is one of the keys to success in any field. Use 3" by 5" review cards to study math's own unique vocabulary. Put the term on one side and the definition on the other. Carry these cards with you everywhere and review them at odd moments throughout the day. You will not even feel like you are studying.

23. Never attempt to memorize a formula (or rule, proof, or procedure) until you have attempted to understand it first. This understanding will help you recreate a formula (or procedure, etc.) if your recall falters in any way. Make sure you can illustrate the definitions, theorems and the use of the symbols. You may want to use 3" by 5" cards to help you memorize some formulas for convenience and quick recall.

24. Write up summary sheets of math terminology and formulas and review them often.

25. Successful math students study math two hours per day at least 5 days a week. In addition, they work out 10 new problems and five review problems during each study session.

26. If math is your most difficult subject, make sure to study it before all other subjects. Do not leave it until the end. You must study math when you re most alert and fresh. It will go better for you and you will recall more. Research also shows that you will retain more information if you take 5 to 10 minute study breaks every 20 to 40 minutes.

27. Act as if you have control of your level of success in math. Act as if you are really enjoying it. Eventually, your habit of pretending and resulting success will make your feelings match your behavior.

BORN FOR KILLING

By Nithya Priya R, Grade IX, HRS, TTL

I WAS BORN IN AUSTRIA
SPENDING MY YOUTH IN POVERTY
I MIGRATED TO MUNICH
AND INCULCATED HATRED TOWARDS SOLIDARITY

I BECAME CORPORAL
AND EARNED MEDALS FOR MY BRAVERY
I MARCHED TOWARDS MY AIM BY THEN
AND ENCOURAGED SLAVERY

I MADE PEOPLE WAIT IN QUE
FOR THEY BELIEVED A LOT IN ME
I BROUGHT UP GERMANY UNDER MY VIEW
ONLY FOR THE SUPPORT I'VE GOT

I DID NOT WANT TO BE A DICTATOR
BUT PEOPLE DECLARED ME SO
I DID NOT WANT TO BE A SPECTATOR
BUT PEOPLE ASKED ME TO DO SO

I THEREFORE CHOSE TO BE A SPECTATOR
NOT FOR A GAME THAT'S SIZZLING
I HATED JEWS AND UNDESIRABLES
SO FOR THE GAME OF KILLING

I KILLED ONE BY ONE IN MY GLOSSARY
FOR I WANTED TO PROMOTE MY RACE
I PLANNED A CONSPIRACY
FOR I DID NOT WANT TO SHOW ANY GRACE

I KILLED,I KILLED,I KILLED
MANY UNDESIRABLES AS I WISHED
I WAS KILLED,KILLED AND KILLED
AS THEY,THE PEOPLE WISHED.

MY DEAR DARLING

By Nithya Priya, Grade IX, HRS, TTL

MY DEAR DARLING,GO AWAY
FAIRER FAR THAN YOUR LAST DAY

IT MAY PUT YOU IN SORROW
THAT COMES TO BID A BITTER TOMORROW

TO THE ROUGH YEAR JUST AWAKE
IN YOUR CRADLE ON THE BRAKE

GO AWAY FAR FROM MEN AND TOWNS
MAY BE TO THE WILD WOODS AND DOWNS

MAKING THE WINTRY WORLD APPEAR
LIKE ONE OF MY SMILEST DEAR

GO TO THE SILENT WILDERNESS
FOR YOU NEED TO REPRESS

I MAY COME TOMORROW
AND SIT BY FIRESIDE WITH SORROW

TO SEE YOUR DEAD BODY
AND YOU'LL BECOME A RECIPIENT FOR EVERYBODY

I'LL REMEMBER YOU:
WHEN YOU HAD THOSE WALKS ACROSSTHE LEAVES
WHERE THE WEAVER WEAVES

I WANTED YOU TO BE :
A DAISY STAR THAT NEVER S
AND DON'T WANT TO BE A SANDHILL ON THE SEA
SO WEAK AND FRAGILE

SO MY DEAR DARLING GO AWAY
FAIRER FAR THAN YOUR LAST DAY.

HITLER'S PROMISES

By Nithya Priya, Grade IX, HRS, TTL

HE MADE MANY PROMISES
TO MAKE PEOPLE BELIEVE HIM
INDEED PEOPLE TOO TRUSTED HIM
THOUGH HIS VIEWS WERE GRIM

HE PROMISED TO BUILD A STRONG NATION
AND UNDO INJUSTICE OF VERSAILLES TREATY
HE MOVED PEOPLE THROUGH HIS PASION
AND MADE THEM SUPPORT HIM

HE ASSURED TO RESTORE GERMAN'S DIGNITY
AND EMPLOY THE YOUTHS
TO THROW AWAY ALL FOREIGN INFLUENCE
AND TO MAINTAIN SERENITY

YEARS OF DEPRESSION (Poem)

By Nithya Priya, Grade IX, HRS, TTL

THE WALL STREET EXCHANGE CRASHED IN 1929
WHEN PEOPLE STARTED WAITING FOR LOANS IN LINES
PEOPLE SOLD THEIR SHARES WITH FEAR
FOR THE NATIONAL INCOME FELL BY HALF FOR SURE

PEOPLE STARTED PEISHING
AS GERMANY FACED ECONOMIC CRISIS
POVERTY WAS FLOURISHING
SO PEOPLE SOLD THEMSELVES AT LOW PRICES

THE UNEMPLOYED YOUTHS WASTED THEIR TIME
BY WALKING ON STREETS WITHOUT ANY AIM
SOME PLAYED CARDS AND SAT SIMPLY ON STREET CORNERS
EXPECTING SOME MONEY FROM THE DONORS.

Saturday, September 6, 2008

Hitler - Reflections by a Student

By Sharon L. George, Grade 9, HRS, TTL.


INTRODUCTION

Hitler’s reign in German unfolds a story of violence and tyranny. The Nazi ideology that Hitler followed is based on some hypothetical theory which he believed to be true. Nazism is not about some isolated acts but was a system, structure of ideas about the world and politics. Nazi Germany changed the lifestyles of the people. Even young children were affected by it. Let us see what some people have to say about their lives affected by Hitler’s activities.

HELMUTH’S SONG
(A BOY NAMED HELMUTH WRITES ABOUT THE INCIDENTS THAT SHOOK HIM AND TERRIFIED HIM.)

In my bed as I lay one night,
I sensed that all wasn’t right.
As I heard my father say,
That he in death may lay.

The Allies were the cause of his fear
Due to which from my eyes fell many a tear.
Next day to the woods he took me,
Where we sang old songs in glee.

Then I saw him being burnt in the fireplace,
For having been among the cruelest of the human race.
I was shocked by what I overheard that night,
And later what came to my very own sight.

I refused to eat at home for nine long years,
Whether my mother would poison me
was among my main fears
.
A Nazi was my father I know to this date,
Due to which he met his leader Hitler’s fate.
Hitler persecuted the crippled and the Jews,
Whom he tortured and killed with no proper excuse.

NAZI’S BLOODFILLED VIEW
(A HISTORIAN WRITES WHAT SHOCKED HIM ABOUT HITLER’S RULE AND HOW FOOLISH IT SEEMS TO BE.)

I know not how man could be so cruel,
Declaring that a specific race alone is worthy of survival.
A man born earth,
Is meant to live and die at God’s destined time.
Then how can some man-made theory prove it wrong?
How can some insane politician kill people to fulfill is imperial ambition?
Hitler was such a man who dreamt,
Of creating a racial state,
Which consisted of pure Nordic Germans,
Considered worthy of existence on this planet.
For which he mercilessly killed innocent people,
And tagged them ‘undesirable’.
Germany was like a box of various coloured balls,
And its inhabitants were the balls.
Hitler removed the balls he didn’t like,
Telling some rubbish, unconvincing excuse.
He caused a fracture to the chain of brotherhood,
And holes to the umbrella of humanity,
Which were too big for anyone to repair,
Too scary for anyone to forget.

CONCLUSION
We have seen what people had to say about Hitler’s rise affecting them. It is not the story of one or two people but of many who were victims of his bitterness. The Nazis denied various minorities the right to live. Hitler’s rule paid utmost importance to racial differences. He wished to form and run a state as per his will. Though he was not completely successful in this endeauvour,he partly fulfilled it. His setback was that he never attempted to understand what the people wanted.

Thursday, September 4, 2008

My Philosophy of Teaching

By C. Radhakrishnan

Before I begin my reflections about teaching, I am reminded of one of Mark Twain's dictum, "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education." I think that the goal of educating school students can only be achieved by presenting them with more than lectures, rote memorization tasks, and straightforward projects (i.e., traditional schooling), an educator must move beyond the traditional model of schooling to a point at which students can learn effectively.

In the fast moving world to succeed as an individual one must learn to be faster, smarter, more creative, and be able to learn from mistakes. How can we prepare students to succeed in this competitive environment? The answer is, at least in part, to move them out of their comfort zone by presenting them with realistic problems that have undefined boundaries and solutions and that require cooperation as well as competition. The goal of this is to help students to learn to be critical thinkers and effective problem solvers so that they can be effective in the days to come.

My Methodology
To achieve the goal of helping students learn, an educator must have a teaching strategy that guides the delivery of the subject content and specific tactics that can be used to achieve success. Several of the principles that I use to guide my teaching activities are presented below.

Preparation is Vital
I believe that one of the most important ways for me to provide high quality teaching is to be prepared for each and every class period. I always strive to be prepared by knowing the material, having visuals prepared, and ordering the class in a logical and consistent manner.

Understand My Subject
A corollary to preparation is the need to understand the subject matter. To present subject content adequately, it is critical to know what I am talking about. This does not imply, of course, that I create a false fa├žade to my students by pretending that I know everything about the topic. This is impossible in most cases. Rather, it is critical that I know the material well enough to help students see how the material relates to society, organizations, and/or themselves.

Know the children
A second corollary to preparation is to know my students. When I say that I need to know my children, I not only mean that I need to learn their names so as to personalise my relationship with them. In addition, I believe that to be an effective educator I must know pertinent information about my pupil. I should be knowledgeable about things like their skills, their reasons for taking the class, and their expectations about the class. This comes from something that I learned from my experience as a teacher. To write well, you must know your audience so that you can write to your reader. This adage is appropriate for educators as well. To share knowledge that is pertinent to students, I must know their needs, expectations, and goals.

Individualised Instruction
I think that an educator should treat each student as an individual. This comes from my recognition that the original role for educators was as a mentor. The mass number that is so common in the school setting today was a later adaptation so that a greater number of students could be educated. Although the mass setting is a necessity, students can still benefit from one-on-one interactions with the teacher. Therefore, I attempt to learn each of my student’s names and address them as individuals in and outside of the classroom. This not only helps me to have a better rapport with students, but I am sure that it improves many students self esteem and positive feelings about the class and the topic presented.

Learners Involvement
A corollary to individualized instruction is encouraging and expecting participation by each student. The classroom should not be a venue for one-way communication. An important part of the learning process is expressing individual opinions and receiving feedback about these opinions. Therefore I use a number of approaches to encourage individual students to participate. For example, I generally require that students in my classes earn participation points via activities both inside and outside of the class. Further, in all of the classes that I teach I frequently call on individual students to answer questions or respond to my inquiries. Finally, in project-based lessons involving difficult concepts I generally ask students to work on in-class cases and exercises. I have found that practical examples help students to better understand complex concepts because each student will need to actively focus his or her thinking on the concept rather than passively listening to a lecture.

Quality is Important

I strive to deliver a quality product to students. Quality is a critical part of effective teaching. To maintain high quality standards, an educator must define realistic objectives, re-examine subject content to make sure the objectives are being met, and implement positive changes that will maintain and improve quality service to students, colleagues, and the society. One of the tools that I have used to incorporate quality improvement into my classes is a supplementary evaluation form. This supplementary form includes both open-ended and scaled questions that deal with both general and specific issues that are pertinent to each class. By monitoring and tracking these evaluations, I have been better able to monitor each class more precisely and tune each class as needed.

Co-relation to Daily Life

I think that to properly educate students at the school level, an educator must make the lessons he or she is teaching pertinent to students. Often this means that lessons should be taught in such a way that each student is able to relate to the topic and apply it to his or her life. This can frequently be accomplished by providing real world examples and cases that demonstrate the concepts that are being taught. For example, I frequently utilize current events to illustrate important concepts and ideas. By discussing information that is in the news and relating such information to the history and political science topics, students often maintain high levels of interest and are better able to see how the concepts operate in a real setting. I can make the topics in history and political science relevant by using it extensively in teaching and managing the classes that I teach. It is somewhat ironic that teachers frequently do not practice what they preach to students. I think that it is critical that when I teach topics related to my subject that I demonstrate its value by using it inside as well as outside the classroom. For example, take different current issues that the world face today and explain to the students how such issues are settled in the past.

Learn Best by Doing

Another corollary to the tenet of making subject content relevant is the issue of activity-based teaching. I believe that the best way for a student to develop a good understanding of a topic is to create opportunities for him or her to act rather than to merely read a book or listen to a lecture. To do this, I incorporate numerous hands-on activities in the classes that I teach. For example, as early as 2000, I have required that students in most of my classes prepare either individual or group projects related to the topics taught such as a report writing, painting a historical scene, writing a historical fiction, biography, skit or organising an open forum, seminar or mock parliament. To meet the challenges of multiple intelligences I give options to the students for selecting the type of projects. This is a very practical exercise that most students find to be very useful and which provides them with experience that helps them understand the difficulties involved in doing all these. This type of exercise is very practical and helps students to understand important concepts related to the topic.

Accept Change
To provide a quality teaching environment, an educator should be willing to change the way that he or she teaches. I am open to change and constantly try to re-evaluate the topics that I teach with the goal of improving the teaching environment. In addition to changing the broader components of the topics, I also try to vary the way I present lessons to students on a day-to-day basis. It is somewhat counterproductive to use the same teaching style day after day. Therefore I often vary the mode of presentation by using, for example, the blackboard on one day, PowerPoint the next day, and hands-on activities on the third day.

Role of Information Technology in Classroom
A corollary to the previous point is to make use of information technology (IT) by using it extensively in teaching and managing the classes that I teach. I utilize technology in presentations, in multimedia quizzing, in contacting and tracking students, and in disseminating information and study materials. For example, I often utilize PowerPoint, the Internet, and software packages that are very popular and useful in order to make presentations or convey ideas to students in a catching style. One very useful tool to accomplish this goal is the Internet because it can be used to show students web sites that illustrate in more concrete ways the concepts being discussed in the class. In addition, I extensively use e-mail to keep in contact with students and in effect, create a virtual classroom environment. In fact, my use of e-mail in the classroom dates back to the late 1990's. As with e-mail, I began using a web page www.schoolnotes.com, in 2006 and have continually used this technology since that time.

Be Fair and Straight Forward
I think that it is critical that students be expected to act responsibly, to learn to be professional, and to meet high standards in the classroom. At the same time, it is also important to be fair and even-handed with all students. To achieve these goals I require that students adhere to deadlines, that they produce quality work, and that they act professionally in their interactions with one another and with me. To make sure that all students have the same opportunity to achieve these goals I always attempt to make my expectations about required performance clear both in written as well as verbal instructions. In addition, however, I also attempt to be fair to all of my students by being impartial in grading and interacting with students and by treating individuals with respect.

Research and Reading is Key

The elements of reading and composition - knowledge, comprehension, comparison, application, analysis and evaluation - are the skills whereby the sun illuminates the darkness from Plato's cave of shadows.I think that the research that an educator is involved in is very relevant to teaching. In my experience, every study material that I have prepared has been relevant to my classes in one manner or another. In addition, the excitement that I feel in discovery cannot help but spill over into the classes that I teach. Thus, reading, scholarship and teaching are closely intertwined and are critical to successful teaching.

It's Fun to Learn
I think that one of the most fulfilling facets of teaching is the joy I feel when I see a student get it. In general, students seem to express a similar sense of joy or happiness when the light beams on in their minds about something that we are covering. In general, learning is something that is supposed to be fun for all concerned. Yet, too often it seems that students and teachers don't experience the fun part of teaching. I think that the best way to learn is to make the topic enjoyable and to create an environment in which students can have a good time while they learn. I therefore try to inject not only humour into lectures and discussions but also make projects fun and enjoyable. In addition, I try to express to my students the fact that I think that the topics that I teach are not only interesting and important, but also that they are usually fun to learn. One of the best ways to do this is to maintain a high level of excitement about the topic and express that excitement to students. In this way I hope to spark the flame of excitement from learning in their minds as well.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Student Values

By C. Radhakrishnan
The 27 student values are as follows, collected into three categories:

Peers
I feel safe at school
School is a happy and friendly place
Students are helpful and co-operative with each other
Students respect each other
There are lots of different types of people in the school
Teachers
I feel involved in making choices and decisions about my school activities.
Teachers are fair when they deal with me
Teachers are friendly, approachable and willing to listen
Teachers are knowledgeable in their subject
Teachers are organised and well prepared
Teachers are positive, enthusiastic and have a sense of humour
Teachers control their anger and remain calm at all times
Teachers encourage and help me to succeed
Teachers maintain discipline
Teachers make the work interesting and fun
Teachers provide me with honest and useful feedback
Teachers respect me
Teachers understand and relate to young people
Systems
Sufficient classroom and other materials are available
The curriculum is wide enough to meet most of my needs
The school encourages high standards
The school has a suitably enforced uniform policy
The school has good teaching and recreational facilities
The school has suitable computing facilities and good technology
The school is a comfortable place to be with sufficient heating, cooling and ventilation
The school is clean and tidy
The school provides me the opportunity to develop life skills

Sunday, August 31, 2008

THE FATE OF THE JEWS

By J.LINITA LYLE, Grade 9, HRS, TTL

In the powerful empire of Germany
The people lived in harmony
Their life seemed to be peaceful
To help others they were always graceful.

Then came the First World War
Germany fought hoping to gain victory
But success seemed to be far
And this led to a chain of events in history.

Germany lost its oversea colonies
To the people was done lot of felonies
It lost many of its valuable minerals
And the Germans were considered criminals.

May youths lost their job
And some started to sob
The unemployed ran helter-skelter
Because they couldn’t find shelter.

Then came Hitler with a great passion
He promised relief for the people’s tension
He wanted to weed out the foreign conspiracies
And replace them with fresh new agencies.

His first target was the Jews
He valued them to as small as dew
He concentrated them in camps
Even though they were innocent like lamps.

Jews were subjected to the final solution
But there was no one to organize a revolution
Hitler was responsible to many people’s funeral
He was an unforgivable criminal.

A Lost Treasure – Happiness

By C. R. Roshin, Grade 9, HRS, TTL.

During the Nazi regime, when Hitler ruled Germany, the Jews were considered unfit to live. They were sent to death camps where they were tortured to death. Here I have recorded the feelings of various stages of a human being of the Jewish Community from my imagination and what I learned form Grade 9 History.

A Lost Treasure – Happiness

A Child,
Where are those happy days?
When I and Gorbachev* used to play together,
Not until he laughed at me,
Pointing at my nose
Even my favourite teacher did so,
Is this because I am Jew?????

And then a Teenager,
Life was easy wasn’t it?
What made it harder?
The Nazis, men in uniforms to commit crimes,
They told they’d send me to camps,
Not an adventure camp,
But a concentration camp!!!!!

And then a mother,
Where should I search for him?
My son,
Is he alive or is he dead???
Didn’t they have any mercy to spare a baby child?
Its dark, it’s rusty here,
Here in the dungeon I’m hiding in!!!!!

And then an Old man,
When I went to the church,
God told me that he would take me soon with him,
But that death should be a peaceful one. Isn’t it??
Those happy days,
When I walked down the road
Waving at everyone I saw!!!
Not until I pushed into this place,
And they call it death camps!!!!

*Gorbachev – A German name used for a boy

Friday, August 29, 2008

Math Anxiety

Overcoming the Fear of Math
By Grace Fleming, About.com
Do you feel a little flushed when you think about doing math homework? Do you think you're no good at math? If you find yourself putting off your math work or dreading math tests, you may suffer from math anxiety.
What is Math Anxiety?
Math Anxiety is a type of fear. Sometimes fear is merely the dread of some unknown that lurks out there. How do you conquer this type of fear? You isolate it, examine it closely, and understand what it's made of. When you do this, you'll soon find that the fear goes away.
There are five common factors and feelings that make us avoid math. When we avoid it, we lose confidence and then start building up dread and fear. Let's confront the things that cause us to avoid math!
"I'm Just Not Cut Out for Math"
Sound familiar? Actually, there is no such thing as a brain type that makes one person better than another at math. Yes, studies show that there are different brain types, but those types just concern your approach at problem solving. Your approach can be different from another students, but it can still be just as effective.
One factor that affects math performance more than any other is confidence. Sometimes a stereotype can make us believe that we are naturally less capable than others. Studies have shown that math stereotypes are not true!
Interestingly, studies do show that positive thinking can improve math performance. Basically, there are two things that you can do to really and truly improve your math performance:
• Don't accept stereotypes about math
• Think positive thoughts.
If you are smart at any skill at all, then you can be smart at math. If you are good at writing or foreign language, for instance, that proves you can be smart at math.
Building Blocks are Missing
This is a legitimate cause for anxiety. If you avoided math in lower grades or you just didn't pay enough attention in middle school, you may be feeling stressed out because you know your background is weak.
There is good news. You can overcome this problem easily by skimming through a textbook that was written for a level slightly lower than your current class. First, you'll be surprised at how much you do know. Secondly, you'll find there are only a few skills you need to practice before you're completely caught up. And those skills will come easily!
Want proof? Think about this: There are many, many adult students who start college after being out of class for ten and twenty years. They survive college algebra by brushing up quickly on forgotten (or never acquired) basic skills using old text books or a refresher course.
You're not as far behind as you think you are! It's never too late to catch up.
It's Just So Boring!
This is a false accusation. Many students who like the drama of literature or social studies may accuse math of being un-interesting.
There are many mysteries in math and science! Mathematicians enjoy debating approaches to long-unsolved problems. From time to time, somebody will discover the solution to a problem that others have sought for years. Math poses challenges that can be amazingly gratifying to conquer.
Additionally, there is a perfection to math that can't be found in many places on this earth. If you like mystery and drama, you can find it in the complexity of math. Think of math as a great mystery to solve.
It Takes Too Much Time
It is true that many people suffer real anxiety when it comes to setting aside a certain span of time and committing to it. This is one of the factors that often leads to procrastination, and it manifests in people of all ages.
For example, many adults put off tasks when they know they will have to devote themselves completely for an hour or two. Perhaps, deep down, we're afraid we'll miss out on something. There is just a certain amount of anxiety or fear that comes with "stepping out" of our life for an hour or two and focusing on one specific thing. This explains why some adults put off paying bills or doing odd jobs around the house.
This is one of those fears that we can overcome, just by acknowledging it.
Realize that it's normal to resist devoting an hour of your thoughts to your math homework. Then simply think your way through your fear. Think about the other things in your life that you'll need to set aside. You'll soon realize that can do without them all for an hour or two.
It's Too Complex to Understand
It is true that math involves some very complex formulas. Remember the process for overcoming any fear? Isolate it, examine it, and break it down into little parts. That's exactly what you have to do in math. Every formula is made of "little parts" or skills and steps that you've learned in the past. It's a matter of building blocks.
When you come across a formula or process that seems too complex, just break it down. If you find that you're a little weak on some of the concepts or steps that make up one element of the formula, then just go back and work on your building blocks.
Suggested Reading
Math Study Tips
Related Articles
Improved Math Scores Through Chess?
My Therapy Journal: 06/15/98 - Panic/Anxiety Disorders

END

DARK LIFE OF THE FRENCH COMMONS

(Before the French Revolution)
By REBECCA SALOMY. S,Grade 9, HRS, TTL

WE WERE DISRESPECTED,
WE WERE DISCRIMINATED,
WE WERE DISCOURAGED,
WE WERE LESS PRIVILEGED.

WE WERE THE ONLY TAX PAYERS,
WE WERE THE ONLY OPPRESSED,
WE WERE THE ONLY BURDEN CAREERS,
WE WERE THE ONLY SUFFERERS OF SUBSISTENCE CRISIS.

WE HAD NO RIGHT TO VOTE,
WE HAD NO BREAD TO EAT,
WE HAD NO LUXURIES OF LIFE,
WE RESORTED TO THE SWORD.

WE WERE THE VOICELESS PEOPLE,
WE WERE THE PEOPLE WITHOUT FREEDOM,
BUT WE ACHIEVED OUR GOAL
BY ABOLISHING FEUDAL SYSTEM.

Creativity: Are You Creating?

Yes, you are a creator.
I am a creator.
We are all creators
It's the law of life.

God is always creating
Three babies are born every minute
There are over 6 billion people on this earth

“Imagination is more important than knowledge”
-Albert Einstein

The richest people in the world are creators.
Entrepreneurs are creators.
You do not receive money from people until you create
something of value that they want and are willing to pay for.

The problem is 90% of humans consume, consume, consume.
But they NEVER cross that bridge to create and produce.
Yes, that’s what separates the “haves” and “have-nots”

Rem ember what John F. Kennedy once said:

‘Ask not what your country can do for you;
Ask what you can do for your country’

What STOPS many people from becoming a creator & producer
is FEAR of FAILING! They want to be PERFECT, to be right,
and don’t make any mistakes.

Business & life is not a connect-the-dots affair.
That’s not the real world we live in.

Real world is you make mistakes.
Real world is you are unsure.
Real world is 8 things don't work and 2 DO work.

Success is 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration

Well, if you do not try, you will not succeed at anything.
If you can imagine it; you can create it!
If you can dream it; you can become it!

Take a look at these famous quotes:

*We get to make a living; we give to make a life. Winston Churchill

*The empires of the future are the empires of the mind. Winston Churchill

*If you can dream it, you can do it." Walt Disney


Today I encourage and empower YOU to become a creator.
Read everything on creativity and learn how to open your mind,
Expand your thoughts and start creating.

The possibilities are endless.

Top 10 CREATIVITY articles to improve yourself
http://www.selfimprovementsguide.com/creativity

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

A STUDENTS PRAYER

Oh God, I have knowledge,
So I pray you'll show me now
How to use it wisely
and find a way somehow
To make the world I live in
a little better place,
And make life, with its problems,

a bit easier to face...

Grant me faith and courage
and put purpose in my days,
And show me how to serve Thee
in the most effective ways
So all my education,
my knowledge and my skill,
May find their true fulfillment
as I learn to do Thy will...
And may I ever be aware
in everything I do
That knowledge comes from learning -
And wisdom comes from You.

Stress Management

Stress Management covers various techniques that are intended to equip a person with different ways to cope with psychological stress. Stress Management can be successful when a person uses the knowledge and techniques they have to cope and deal with the stressful situations in their life. There are many ways to deal with stress and below is a list of 10 quick and easy methods that a person can do to reduce their stress levels.

10 Stress Relief Tips
Before mentioning some of the stress relieving tips its important to point of some of the things that can cause stress in peoples lives. Most people don't realize this but things such as watching TV, drinking, or smoking are things that can reduce mental sharpness and increase stress. So when you are having a stressful time in your life remember that the solution to watch TV, drink, or have a smoke are some of the activities you want to avoid when trying to reduce your stress levels.

1. Go for a jog or even a brisk walk around the block. It is always a good idea to exercise when you are stressed because it helps relieve the tension in your body and release endorphins that helps your body relax.

2. Take a hot shower or bath. Warm waters helps to relax your muscles.

3. Visit a local massage therapist. Similar to the first two points a massage can help relieve the tension in your muscles and help you relax.

4. Hatha Yoga. A very relaxing system of body movements that helps relieve tension and relaxes the body.

5. Acupuncture. Helps relieve the tension in your muscles especially if other methods such as massages and exercise don't work.

6. Acupressure. This is very similar to Acupuncture but without needles. So if you are scared of needles this maybe the way to go.

7. Reflexology. This is similar to having a massage but all the massages are focused on the hands and feet. Since there are nerve endings in your hands and feet this helps relieve stress by massaging those areas.

8. Breathing. The most easy method of Stress Management is to just breathe. Usually you would want to do slow deep and steady breathes to relieve stress.

9. A relaxation technique. This technique requires you to lie on the ground with your legs uncrossed and your arms at your side. Basically what you do is tense one muscle group at a time and then relax it and move from your feet to your scalp. Do this fot 15-20 minutes and you should feel less stress once your finished.

10. L-Glutamine. This is an amino acid that everyone has in their bodies. It is shown in studies to improve self-hydration, boosts your immune system, and incrases growth hormones by over 400% with just a 2g dose.
The list mentioned above is only a few of the techniques for stress management. There are many other ways to reduce stress. Some of the other techniques include: conflict resolution, meditation, stress balls, progressive relaxation, fractional relaxation, natural medicine, and time management.

Measuring Stress
There are ways to measure a persons stress level. One of the ways to measure a persons stress level is by using a Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale to rate stressful life events. Another way to measure someones stress level is by measuring changes in blood pressure and galvanic skin response. A digital thermometer can also be used to measure skin temperature which can determine stress levels.
Two models of stress management

Transactional model
This model was developed by Richard Lazarus and Susan Folkman in 1984. Basically what they though was that stress was caused by an imbalance between demands and resources. It was also thought that stress occurred when pressure exceeded one's perceived ability to cope. With this model it was believed that it wasn't the stressor causing the stress but rather one's resources and ability to cope with the stress or pressure. If one was not able to manage the stress then their stress levels would go up and they would be unable to cope.

Health realization/innate health model
This model is similar to the transactional model in that its believed that stress itself does not necessarily follow the presence of a potential stressor. The focus of this model is the same as the transactional model in that the focus is on his or her own coping skills. It also focuses on the nature of thought, stating that it is ultimately a person's thought processes that determines the response to potentially stressful external circumstances. By using this model one can realize when they are having stressful thoughts and disengage from them and therefore naturally relieving stress.

Benefits of Bachelor of Commerce Course

By C. Radhakrishnan

I, as a teacher very strongly believe that one should choose a course on the basis of pure interest rather than peer pressure, parental pressure or circumstantial pressure. The following facts very clearly illustrate the current relevance of this course.
In my analysis and discussions with known people about the scope and aim of this course, I found that the Bachelor of Commerce Degree Course aims to provide students with a good grounding in various fields of business and an opportunity to specialize in a selected area of business. The syllabus prescribed by the universities is designed for a rapidly changing world with innovation, market-relevance, flexibility and an international focus. This builds a bridge between the academic environment and the world outside.
The subject, Accounting will enable you to understand and critically analyze financial reporting issues and their impact within the framework of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. They will also develop an understanding of cost and management accounting techniques for planning, decision-making and performance evaluation. This will provide a foundation in the procedures of auditing and international taxation.
The subject, Finance will allow you to gain an in-depth understanding of the role of financial management in the business firm, including the calculation and use of financial ratios. This can also develop an understanding of how companies choose between possible investments and how they raise capital. Besides, you can acquire knowledge about the role of financial institutions particularly the operation of securities markets. The course will equip you with the ability to analyze the riskiness of investments and the use of hedging with options and futures to reduce the risk of an investment portfolio.
I understood that the Bachelor of Commerce is designed to prepare students with a good grounding in various fields of business studies while focusing on the Human Resource Management specialization. The program equips us with the ability to identify, analyze and solve complex business problems. From a human resource perspective, students can develop abilities to understand the environment and processes of recruitment and selection, apply concepts and techniques to promote change, manage and develop people and apply appropriate occupational health and safety practices in organizations. In brief this will provide critical perspectives on the role and functions of HR professionals.
Management is the art and science of planning, coordinating and leading group efforts. It is the mobilizing of human and material resources to achieve organizational goals. Managerial skills include the ability to make sound judgments on issues that arise at work and to achieve objectives through organizational skills. I know that this course aims to provide a basic understanding of how to apply key managerial concepts and theories in the contemporary work environment. I strongly assume that B. Com assists students in developing interpersonal skills and to understand how group dynamics affect individual and group behaviour. They develop an understanding of sources of change, barriers to change and effective ways of overcoming them.
It also provides the skills to generate products and services for which there is a defined customer need and to position the product or service in the market with effective promotion, pricing and distribution strategies. I hope it is geared towards problem-solving and management decision making and seeks to engage students in critical thinking processes, requiring in-depth analysis of qualitative and quantitative market data and development of subsequent marketing strategies.
The Bachelor of Commerce is designed to prepare students with a good grounding in various fields of business studies such as economics, accounting, management, and marketing. The course equips us with the ability, tools and multi-dimensional expertise required in the fields of commercial activities from a technical and financial perspective. The Bachelor of Commerce is structured so as to develop professionals to be career ready and able to effectively apply competence and implement strategies within the context of current fast growing globalised commercial world of business.
Finally the subjects available within the B.Com lead to careers in virtually every area of business and government in India and internationally. Possible career paths include money market operations, professional accounting, financial journalism, sport promotion, social and economic policy development, international trade, human resources and teaching and information systems. It is my firm conviction that this course will equip learners with all required talents to excel in today’s increasingly competitive and global environment.